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Biden says US is ‘on the right path’ despite latest GDP report

Watch the president’s live remarks above.President Joe Biden said Thursday the nation is “on the right path” despite recession fears fueled by the latest report from the Commerce Department showing the U.S. economy shrank again in the second quarter. The nation’s gross domestic product fell by 0.9% on an annualized basis from April through June, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said Thursday. While there is no steadfast rule governing what defines a recession in the United States, it is commonly understood to be two consecutive quarters of the country’s gross domestic product shrinking. But a small group of economists on the Business Cycle Dating Committee officially define when the U.S. economy is in a recession, and they define a recession as involving “a significant decline in economic activity that is spread across the economy and lasts more than a few months.”The White House has been trying for weeks to downplay the significance of Thursday’s GDP report, arguing the data does not reflect the latest progress the nation’s economy has made, including the recent drop in gas prices across the nation. Top Biden administration officials continue to insist the economy is not in recession amid rampant inflation.”Coming off of last year’s historic economic growth — and regaining all the private sector jobs lost during the pandemic crisis — it’s no surprise that the economy is slowing down as the Federal Reserve acts to bring down inflation,” Biden said in a statement released Thursday.He continued, “But even as we face historic global challenges, we are on the right path, and we will come through this transition stronger and more secure.”The president is scheduled to deliver two speeches related to the economy from the White House on Thursday.The first is expected to be on the latest deal on an energy and health care bill — the Inflation Reduction Act — that was announced Wednesday evening by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia.The deal represents a major breakthrough in negotiations that have been ongoing for more than a year and contains a number of Democratic priorities, including investing $369 billion into energy and climate change programs, with the goal of reducing carbon emissions by 40% by 2030. The bill will face fierce GOP opposition but stands a real chance of becoming law as soon as August.Hours later, the president is scheduled to speak about the economy more broadly and meet with CEOs to receive an update on economic conditions across several industries, the White House says. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo and Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers Cecilia Rouse are expected to attend.The latest GDP reading comes one day after the Federal Reserve hiked interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point for a second time this year in an attempt to tame rampant inflation. Wednesday’s rate hike represents the first time in modern Fed history that the central bank has raised interest rates by 75 basis points twice in a row.It also comes the same week another key economic indicator showed consumer confidence slipped for the third straight month.

Watch the president’s live remarks above.

President Joe Biden said Thursday the nation is “on the right path” despite recession fears fueled by the latest report from the Commerce Department showing the U.S. economy shrank again in the second quarter.

The nation’s gross domestic product fell by 0.9% on an annualized basis from April through June, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said Thursday. While there is no steadfast rule governing what defines a recession in the United States, it is commonly understood to be two consecutive quarters of the country’s gross domestic product shrinking. But a small group of economists on the Business Cycle Dating Committee officially define when the U.S. economy is in a recession, and they define a recession as involving “a significant decline in economic activity that is spread across the economy and lasts more than a few months.”

The White House has been trying for weeks to downplay the significance of Thursday’s GDP report, arguing the data does not reflect the latest progress the nation’s economy has made, including the recent drop in gas prices across the nation. Top Biden administration officials continue to insist the economy is not in recession amid rampant inflation.

“Coming off of last year’s historic economic growth — and regaining all the private sector jobs lost during the pandemic crisis — it’s no surprise that the economy is slowing down as the Federal Reserve acts to bring down inflation,” Biden said in a statement released Thursday.

He continued, “But even as we face historic global challenges, we are on the right path, and we will come through this transition stronger and more secure.”

The president is scheduled to deliver two speeches related to the economy from the White House on Thursday.

The first is expected to be on the latest deal on an energy and health care bill — the Inflation Reduction Act — that was announced Wednesday evening by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia.

The deal represents a major breakthrough in negotiations that have been ongoing for more than a year and contains a number of Democratic priorities, including investing $369 billion into energy and climate change programs, with the goal of reducing carbon emissions by 40% by 2030. The bill will face fierce GOP opposition but stands a real chance of becoming law as soon as August.

Hours later, the president is scheduled to speak about the economy more broadly and meet with CEOs to receive an update on economic conditions across several industries, the White House says. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo and Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers Cecilia Rouse are expected to attend.

The latest GDP reading comes one day after the Federal Reserve hiked interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point for a second time this year in an attempt to tame rampant inflation. Wednesday’s rate hike represents the first time in modern Fed history that the central bank has raised interest rates by 75 basis points twice in a row.

It also comes the same week another key economic indicator showed consumer confidence slipped for the third straight month.



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