Politics

CA Superintendent Faces Threats for Investigating Students With Swastikas


  • A California school superintendent said she’s facing death threats after announcing an investigation into students posing with swastikas.
  • Nicole Newman said she saw a photo of Wheatland Union High School students with thick, black swastikas painted onto their torsos.
  • “This has been one of the most traumatizing experiences in my life and in the lives of my colleagues,” she said.

A school superintendent from California said she’s been “subjected to death threats on a daily basis” after launching an investigation into a photo showing a group of students posing with swastikas drawn on their bodies. 

“This has been one of the most traumatizing experiences in my life and in the lives of my colleagues,” said Wheatland Union High School District Superintendent Nicole Newman on in a video shared to Facebook on Thursday.

She and her colleagues have also received “threats that are aimed against our families,” Newman added in the video. 

The photo, showing eight white students with thick, black swastikas painted onto their torsos, went viral on social media. The students, some of whom are holding alcoholic beverages, appear to be at a house party. The students attend Wheatland Union High School, Newman confirmed.

“When I first saw them, I was profoundly disturbed and heartbroken. I knew just how much pain these images were going to cause our community,” Newman said.

The students have been disciplined, according to the Sacramento Bee. But details of the consequences they are expected to face were not publicly shared for legal reasons.

Newman said the video message posted on Thursday would be the last public update on the case “as we cannot legally go into detail regarding the discipline of these students.”

“There is no denying that, the choices made by the students in the picture were hurtful and deeply troubling. Their actions do not represent who we are as a school district and community,” Newman said in a separate statement on December 23. 

Newman said she’d reach out to elected officials and “key community stakeholders” to “begin the process of having a broader community conversation about how we can work together to prevent this type of issue from ever happening again.”



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