News

Heatwave impacts US winemakers, vineyards

this spring. Portland’s received more rain than normal, causing some crops to fall behind. Winemaker Don Krank says, hawks view vineyard produced 40 to 60% less of their five year average. Additionally, that cool and wet spring really slowed everything down. First. We had *** little bit of *** frost right after bud break, so that killed some of our buds. In fact, it has helped allowing the vineyards to catch up. But crank says in extreme heat, the plants can shut down if we can get those really cool nights which retain the acid structure of the wines and then it gets down to 55 60 degrees at night and gets up to 90 90 to 94 in the daytime. That’s kind of perfect ripening weather. One big plus is that workers here didn’t yet remove some of the leafy cover and that was *** good decision. If you’ve gone and pulled your leaves and the sun strikes your grapes, you might see sunburn. That could be *** negative. Hawks view vineyard says if they have *** wet fall, they could be in trouble, but if the weather holds up and stays dry, they’ll be in good shape if it rains and fall, we have *** lot of, *** lot of powdery mildew pressure, *** lot of dryness in here, which is *** mold though. They may be making less wine this year. The wine, they will make will be high quality Reporting in Sherwood, Pauline, Aguilar Fox 12 Oregon

This spring, Portland, Oregon, received more rain than normal, causing some crops to fall behind.Winemaker Don Crank says Hawksview Vineyard produced 40% to 60% less than their five-year average.”Additionally, cool and wet spring really slowed everything down. We first we had a little bit of a frost after my break so that kill some of our buds in fact,” Crank said.But the heat that has swept across most of the U.S. has helped, allowing vineyards to catch up on production. But, Crank said that extreme heat can cause some plants to shut down.”If we can get those really cool nights which retain the acid structure of the wines,” Crank said. “So, if it gets down to 55-60 degrees at night and gets up to 92-94 in the daytime thats kind of perfect ripening weather.” One big plus is that workers at Hawksview didn’t yet remove some of the leafy cover from the crops.”If you go and pull your leaves and the sun strikes your grapes, you might see sunburn, that could be a negative,” Crank said.Watch the video above for more on this story.

This spring, Portland, Oregon, received more rain than normal, causing some crops to fall behind.

Winemaker Don Crank says Hawksview Vineyard produced 40% to 60% less than their five-year average.

“Additionally, cool and wet spring really slowed everything down. We first we had a little bit of a frost after my break so that kill some of our buds in fact,” Crank said.

But the heat that has swept across most of the U.S. has helped, allowing vineyards to catch up on production. But, Crank said that extreme heat can cause some plants to shut down.

“If we can get those really cool nights which retain the acid structure of the wines,” Crank said. “So, if it gets down to 55-60 degrees at night and gets up to 92-94 in the daytime thats kind of perfect ripening weather.”

One big plus is that workers at Hawksview didn’t yet remove some of the leafy cover from the crops.

“If you go and pull your leaves and the sun strikes your grapes, you might see sunburn, that could be a negative,” Crank said.

Watch the video above for more on this story.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.