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One of Louisville’s busiest roads could be getting a facelift

The Preston Corridor Project was once again at the center of discussion in Louisville on Thursday. After a two-day workshop in November, to determine the future of the corridor, Metro’s office of advanced planning and sustainability held three community engagement sessions to show the results from those brainstorming sessions.”In November we were in the beginning of the process,” said Michael King, director of metro’s office of advanced planning and sustainability. “Today and going forward, we’ve heard all of the ideas. After today we will post the ideas online, and continue to allow people to share their thoughts. By mid-to-late fall, we hope to be done with the planning process, and looking toward construction.”King said it’s a project that’s been in the works since 2016. During that year, the office came up with a document called Move Louisville: A long-range transportation plan. In that plan, they identified a number of streets that needed to, at the very least, be improved.”We are looking to do what we call complete street retro-fits,” King said. “So it’s looking at these corridors and recognizing that they are high crash volume areas. They need to be modernized.”King said Preston Highway is on that list of dangerous Louisville corridors that need to be repaired, behind the Dixie Highway corridor and the Broadway corridor.”With Dixie Highway, we’ve already implemented the premium bus service that’s going down there,” King said. “Broadway plans are close to complete, and then its this .”He said, since its completion in 2019 crashes on Dixie have slowed. “It’s improved,” King said. “We’re still getting crash data in, and from what we are seeing right now it looks like there have been some very positive trends in terms of crashes, especially the severity of those crashes.”That’s the sort of effect he’s hoping happens to the Preston Corridor, and some area neighbors couldn’t agree more.”I would describe it as wild and woolly,” said Joyce Freadreacea, a nearby neighbor. “People are so anxious, and in such a hurry.”Fredreacea lives on Gilmore lane just off Preston Highway and was one of the dozens of residents who showed up Thursday to look at the city’s plans and provide feedback.”We worry about the idea of narrowing the lanes from 12 to 10 feet,” she said to one of the metro representatives.King said the plan now is to take the feedback they got from the community and come up with renderings of the project by mid-Fall.Until then, Freadreacea said she and her neighbors will be driving with utmost caution.To learn more about the project and receive regular updates about the Preston Corridor Plan, visit www.prestoncorridorplan.org.

The Preston Corridor Project was once again at the center of discussion in Louisville on Thursday.

After a two-day workshop in November, to determine the future of the corridor, Metro’s office of advanced planning and sustainability held three community engagement sessions to show the results from those brainstorming sessions.

“In November we were in the beginning of the process,” said Michael King, director of metro’s office of advanced planning and sustainability. “Today and going forward, we’ve heard all of the ideas. After today we will post the ideas online, and continue to allow people to share their thoughts. By mid-to-late fall, we hope to be done with the planning process, and looking toward construction.”

King said it’s a project that’s been in the works since 2016. During that year, the office came up with a document called Move Louisville: A long-range transportation plan. In that plan, they identified a number of streets that needed to, at the very least, be improved.

“We are looking to do what we call complete street retro-fits,” King said. “So it’s looking at these corridors and recognizing that they are high crash volume areas. They need to be modernized.”

King said Preston Highway is on that list of dangerous Louisville corridors that need to be repaired, behind the Dixie Highway corridor and the Broadway corridor.

“With Dixie Highway, we’ve already implemented the premium bus service that’s going down there,” King said. “Broadway plans are close to complete, and then its this [Preston].”

He said, since its completion in 2019 crashes on Dixie have slowed.

“It’s improved,” King said. “We’re still getting crash data in, and from what we are seeing right now it looks like there have been some very positive trends in terms of crashes, especially the severity of those crashes.”

That’s the sort of effect he’s hoping happens to the Preston Corridor, and some area neighbors couldn’t agree more.

“I would describe it as wild and woolly,” said Joyce Freadreacea, a nearby neighbor. “People are so anxious, and in such a hurry.”

Fredreacea lives on Gilmore lane just off Preston Highway and was one of the dozens of residents who showed up Thursday to look at the city’s plans and provide feedback.

“We worry about the idea of narrowing the lanes from 12 to 10 feet,” she said to one of the metro representatives.

King said the plan now is to take the feedback they got from the community and come up with renderings of the project by mid-Fall.

Until then, Freadreacea said she and her neighbors will be driving with utmost caution.

To learn more about the project and receive regular updates about the Preston Corridor Plan, visit www.prestoncorridorplan.org.



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